Last edited by Kigashura
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

6 edition of The criminal law system of medieval and Renaissance Florence found in the catalog.

The criminal law system of medieval and Renaissance Florence

by Laura Ikins Stern

  • 358 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Johns Hopkins University Press in Baltimore .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Italy,
  • Florence,
  • Florence.
    • Subjects:
    • Criminal justice, Administration of -- Italy -- Florence -- History.,
    • Renaissance -- Italy -- Florence.,
    • Law, Medieval.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-279) and index.

      StatementLaura Ikins Stern.
      SeriesThe Johns Hopkins University studies in historical and political science ;, 112th ser., 1
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsKKH9851.86 .S74 1994
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxii, 286 p. ;
      Number of Pages286
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1406275M
      ISBN 100801846722
      LC Control Number93014557

      Both this medieval civil law, the Corpus juris civilis, and Gratian's decretals-cum-canon law, Corpus juris canonici, find their blossoming here. Within this century-long development and codification, the canon documents of ecclesia (decretals and bulls) and the civil laws inherited from Justinian are interpolated and cross fertilized. Crime and Punishment in Renaissance Florence Article in The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology () 81(3) January with Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Marvin E. Wolfgang.

      The Internet Medieval Sourcebook is located at the. Fordham University Center for Medieval Studies. Guide to Contents. This section of the Sourcebook collects the various online texts related to the history of law. Main Page will take you back to Sourcebook main page. Full Texts will take you to the index of full text medieval sources. Acquittal, in criminal law, acknowledgment by the court of the innocence of the defendant or a judgment may be made by a jury in a trial or by a judge who rules that there is insufficient evidence either for conviction or for further proceedings. An acquittal removes all guilt in acquittal “in fact” occurs when a jury finds the defendant not guilty.

      The Renaissance really gets going in the early years of 15th century in Florence. In this period, which we call the Early Renaissance, Florence is not a city in the unified country of Italy, as it is now. Instead, Italy was divided into many city-states (Florence, Milan, Venice etc.), each with their own government (some were ruled by despots. Each individual, doctrine and assembly can be considered some of the major component of Criminal Law during the Medieval Ages. I hope you enjoy! Salic Law. The Salic Law, pictured above, was the code of the Salian Franks and the most important of all Teutonic laws. Implemented during the reign of King Clovis (c. ), the law was again.


Share this book
You might also like
Americas Hardwood Forests

Americas Hardwood Forests

Baxteriana.

Baxteriana.

Studium et hospitium

Studium et hospitium

Global and Indian trade policy changes

Global and Indian trade policy changes

Pedes finium

Pedes finium

Somerset Maugham

Somerset Maugham

Technicolor 60s

Technicolor 60s

Retrofit opportunities for energy management and cogeneration

Retrofit opportunities for energy management and cogeneration

Active List of Permissible Explosives and Blasting Devices Approved Previous to June 30, 1943.

Active List of Permissible Explosives and Blasting Devices Approved Previous to June 30, 1943.

The criminal law system of medieval and Renaissance Florence by Laura Ikins Stern Download PDF EPUB FB2

Free Online Library: The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence. by "Renaissance Quarterly"; Humanities, general Literature, writing, book reviews Book reviews Books.

Book analyzing the law system of Florence, Italy during the Italian Renaissance; specifically it outlines the structure of the government, offices, and philosophies of Cited by: 6.

The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence describes the law, procedure, courts, police and crime from the late thirteenth century through the early fifteenth century.

The court system and inquisition procedure reached their furthest development in the early fifteenth century before the Medici recall in and before citizen-manned courts eroded ius commune procedures and : () Get this from a library. The criminal law system of medieval and Renaissance Florence.

[Laura Ikins Stern] -- Historians of medieval and Renaissance Italy have long held that the Florentine republic fell victim to rule by oligarchy in the early fifteenth century.

Now, in the first complete analysis of the. The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science) [Stern, Professor Laura I.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science)Cited by: 6.

Marvin E. Wolfgang, Crime and Punishment in Renaissance Florence, 81 J. Crim. & Criminology () /90/ THE JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL LAW & CRIMINOLOGY Vol. 81, No. 3Cited by: 2. Crime, Society and the Law in Renaissance Italy - edited by Trevor Dean April The judicial system in Florence in the fourteenth Crime, Society and the Law in Renaissance Italy Late medieval Florence offers special opportunities for the study of justice and criminality: the largest judicial archive of the age, a lively.

Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology Volume 69 Issue 2Summer Article 8 Summer Law and Punishment in Early Renaissance Venice Guido Ruggiero Follow this and additional works at: by: 6. The book deals with the medieval and Renaissance criminal law system in Florence primarily as a judicial institution and secondarily as part of the central government.

In addition, philosophies of prosecution and profiles of criminality are historically reviewed. References, notes, and tables: Main Term(s): Criminology: Index Term(s). This book, though admittedly probably for a rather limited reading audience, is exactly what it says: a study of Criminal Law and Justice in Late Renaissance Italy.

So happy to have discovered it, and I recommend it highly who is fascinated with all things concerning Italy during the by: 5. The Court of the Captain of the People was part of the judicial system of Florence, Italy, in the fourteenth century.

It was created to defend the common man from political infighting between the Papacy and the Holy Roman Emperor. Powerful families such as the Medici arranged advantageous marriages for themselves and developed political and financial ties to other powerful.

Death and Ritual in Renaissance Florence. The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence. La societat rural a Catalunya en temps feudals: Valles Oriental, segles XIII-XVI. His Majesty's Rebels: Communities, Factions and Rural Revolt in the Black Fores, Mercenary Companies and the Decline of Siena.

Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence will appeal to social historians of Europe, medieval and early modern, especially those concerned with family life, women, and children, as well as all those interested in Florentine history.

Legal historians will find it useful as well. Florence (Italian: Firenze) weathered the decline of the Western Roman Empire to emerge as a financial hub of Europe, home to several banks including that of the politically powerful Medici city's wealth supported the development of art during the Italian Renaissance, and tourism attracted by its rich history continues today.

Many parts of the criminal justice system in colonial America were similar to those in England, France, and the Dutch Republic. Gradually French and Dutch influences disappeared in the islands.

What remained was the basic idea many had of the English common law system. This system was the best-known to seventeenth-century colonists. WBO Student Loading. Renaissance Florence paid homage to the values and rights associated with freedom.

It was governed by a body of citizens rather than by a prince, and Florentines did not take their right of self-government for granted. Indeed, Florentines treated freedom as both prerequisite and ultimate expression of virtue. Yet, somehow Florence also was the scene of a burgeoning of urban-domestic : Orlando Patterson.

Medieval and Renaissance Florence, Volume 2 Harper torchbooks Harper torchbooks, TB Harper torchbooks: Academy library Medieval and Renaissance Florence, Ferdinand Schevill: Author: Ferdinand Schevill: Edition: reprint, revised: Publisher: Harper & Row, Original from: the University of Michigan: Digitized: Export.

Property of Spouses in Law in Renaissance Florence. Book Reviews An Italian Renaissance Sextet: Six Tales in Historical Context. The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence.

This volume was conceived by the editors in April to mark the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Lauro Martines’sLawyers and Statecraft in Renaissance Florence(Princeton ).Immediately recognized as a masterpiece of archival history, Martines’s book broke with traditional approaches to both Florentine and legal history and opened up avenues of research that have been.

The History Learning Site, 5 Mar 18 Dec Law and order was very harsh in Medieval England. Those in charge of law and order believed that people would only learn how to behave properly if they feared what would happen to them if they broke the law.

Even the ‘smallest’ offences had serious punishments. The oldest known depiction of Florence. Painted by Bernardo Daddi in the 13th century. Museum Bigallo, Florence.

– Source: Wikipedia. Florence is known as the cradle of the Renaissance, but it was the wealth amassed in the Middle Ages that made this golden period possible.Ikins Stern, Laura, The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, ).

Klapish-Zuber, Christiane, Retour à la cité: Les magnats de Florence, – (Paris: Éditions de l'École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, ).